Skip to main content

Reply to "How much job hopping is too much?"

I was going to just read the comments and not respond until I realized that none of the comments answered the question of what is TOO MUCH job-hopping. Granted I come from a generation of workers, that tend to try to stay at one job, as long as it provides enough salary to meet your lifestyle and necessity bills. Granted there were times, I wanted to quit because of things like coworkers who took advantage of others, by slacking off and only appearing "busy" when they wanted to impress the boss, or never getting holidays off, because "someone has to work", etc. But I learned to realize that I valued having a roof over my head and having a steady income to looking to start all over again in a new job. I did have a bit of newness every now and then with the job I had because I was the one asked to transfer to different stores, as they closed down units or to fill in for shortages, which I did as long as the travel (commute) was overwhelming. This is not to say that I didn't interview for job positions over my years working, but I realized that I would never gain the salary I wanted for my position because the companies were looking to hire the most amount of talent with the least amount of pay, which I h see myself as the years went by, stepping back in pay, to be abused in a new company. I gave myself a temporary raise by working a second job which turned into a full-time job at the level of pay I wanted, so I could quit one job, but finding jobs that pay better doesn't guarantee better work/life situations. There's always a catch.

I can understand the need to find the perfect life/work situation but one also has to realize that work involves being part of a team, which means one has to compromise certain things, which one should negotiate up front in the initial interviews plus really research the actual job situations and don't assume that everything is perfect. Yes, there are certain situations that are instantaneously intolerable, but there are plenty of situations in jobs, where you have to just go with the flow. Changing jobs often put up red flags, unless the company hiring doesn't care about retaining their employees and likes constant turnover, which should be a red flag warning for the job candidate to ask.

×
×
×
×