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Most Affordable Cities to Buy a Home

Home buying is expensive. And it’s not just in places like San Francisco, Seattle, or Austin. The reality is that people are being priced out of home buying in most major U.S. cities, leaving you to wonder: Is there anywhere I can afford to buy a home?

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We only looked at the largest 100 metro areas for the video. So out of curiosity, I pulled the April data from Realtor.com to identify some less frigid places. Realtor.com tracks median home list prices for about 917 metro areas, cities and towns.

If you like a small-town vibe, you may be able to find a good deal in one of these towns, which had a median home list price of less than $150,000 last month:

  • Southwest Region: Borger, TX; Grants, NM; Pampa, TX; and Vernon, TX
  • Southeast Region: Columbus, GA; Memphis, TN; Mobile, AL; and Montgomery, AL

Unfortunately, cities in the West are some of the most expensive places to buy a home. For example, the median home list price in California was a whopping $749,999 last month! In Florida where I live, the median home list price was $472,990. My wife and I feel fortunate to have purchased our home long before prices got so high.

What about you guys? What's home buying like in your city or state? Is anyone looking to buy a home or saving for down payment? Do you have any tips for first-time homebuyers?

@TCM posted:

6 out of your top 10 were in just 2 states. Nothing in the southeast, southwest, west, northwest...nothing. So why would I want to live in an area where my biggest investment (house) is growing less in value than almost anywhere else in the country? Maybe those cities are more affordable because, in general, there is more economic opportunity in almost any other place. I'm sure there are a few exceptions, but again, in general, who wants to live in Scranton or in Detroit?

Wish someone would post reasonable places to live that aren't freezing all the time and where crime isn't high.

@Will S. posted:

It appears Ohio is the place to be for a great balance of livability and affordability!

Just because something is affordable doesn't make it a great place to live. Do some research on Ohio's worst ranked places to live in crime. Dayton is 4th. Cleveland is 5th. If you rank the worst places to live overall, Cleveland is ranked 10th, Dayton is 5th, Toledo is 4th, and Youngstown is 1st. Poverty rates are sky high, unemployment is too, of course the houses are affordable because no one wants to live there.

Other than sources on the internet, you can ask me. I've been here for almost 50 years and I'm looking to get out of here. Lived near or in Cleveland most of my life.

6 out of your top 10 were in just 2 states. Nothing in the southeast, southwest, west, northwest...nothing. So why would I want to live in an area where my biggest investment (house) is growing less in value than almost anywhere else in the country? Maybe those cities are more affordable because, in general, there is more economic opportunity in almost any other place. I'm sure there are a few exceptions, but again, in general, who wants to live in Scranton or in Detroit?

If Ohio had done the right thing and developed a smart, modern passenger railway system that would connect larger cities with smaller "affordable" places to live, this would be a dream come true.  Growth rate tends to be at a snail's pace.  If you're okay with subtle vibes, energy, ambience, then Ohio's for you.  Just my opinion, folks.

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