Tagged With "advice"

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Re: Who taught you your most important money lesson and what was it?

Moore Income ·
Pay yourself first. This I learned from many books and successful people. It is a principal that truly works when you start applying it. There is a lot that could be said about it but the best book I have read on the subject would have to be The Richest Man in Babylon. You can find it on Amazon but if you want to save some money and get more books for less, I recommended Thrift Books.
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Re: Who taught you your most important money lesson and what was it?

AverageJoe ·
If we tithe to a local church, how do we pay ourselves first? Should we come directly AFTER the church, and then bills, food etc? Just curious on your take on it.
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Re: Who taught you your most important money lesson and what was it?

Moore Income ·
Good question. I personally view tithing as giving back a portion to God in thankfulness for what He has given me. Therefore I would apply the principle of paying myself first after tithe. For those of us who do this, it means we have to learn to live off of only 80% of what we earn instead of 90% but I think it is a good way to learn to live below our means. And if you practice the principle of tithing first, you can trust God's promises in His Word to take care of those who holds Him in ...
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Re: Who taught you your most important money lesson and what was it?

Sewspcl ·
My mother. She always said make a trash small. Save your pennies, pick up a penny. Water down everything to make more including soup, spaghetti sauces, gravies. We made and popcorn and VHS tapes to entertain ourselves. Always pay yourself 1st period try saving $50 a week by the end of the month you've got $200. If not weekly try bi-weekly. Don't throw out old clothes just cut them up and make a blanket or throw. Being thrifty doesn't mean being cheap. Because you always end up with more...
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Re: Who taught you your most important money lesson and what was it?

Sewspcl ·
Pay yourself 1st then pay your bills and tithing. Is not ego it's economics. If you get sick because you're not eating could you can afford food but you going to church every week who are you helping? Let go of ego and pay yourself 1st. Then get back to others. Make sure the church that you are giving to does not squander your money on wines and fine china like my church did.
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Re: Who taught you your most important money lesson and what was it?

Moore Income ·
@SEWSPCL Interested in understanding why you consider it "ego"?
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Re: Who taught you your most important money lesson and what was it?

BeckAtsila ·
"Pennies add up to dimes, and dimes add up to dollars." My across-the-street neighbor when I was 4.
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Re: Who taught you your most important money lesson and what was it?

KellyFromKeene ·
I cant think of a particular person- but I can think of things I learned from several people. My parents taught me that tithing is important, although I have not always done that. My ex taught me that I don't need a lot of things to be happy- after I lost it all in a divorce. My boyfriend taught me how important it is to save and plan for the future. My kids taught me that people are the most important thing and that everything else is a distant second.
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Re: Who taught you your most important money lesson and what was it?

FreebiePharm ·
I would say my parents but by doing what they didn't do. I prefer not to spend my money, I am always looking for ways I can obtain things I need for free. The only financial footstep I followed was buying a new car and having that debt, which I wish I had never done. I should have bought a used car and had it paid off.
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Re: Who taught you your most important money lesson and what was it?

Kenny Mathe ·
To pay myself first is the good idea for example if may salary is less do I have to pay half of my salary to make my tithe and I would be left with nothing to pay my bills and my children remain without food in the house.If I pay what I can afford is it a problem
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Re: Who taught you your most important money lesson and what was it?

Bonnie Squires ·
Once I get my tax return I putting a good amount of money in the bank. Once I get a bill from my old place paid off than that will go into the bank account it wont be much only $10 a week but that an extra $40 a month in the bank.
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Re: What is the worst financial advice you've ever received?

Moore Income ·
I think some of the worst advice for making money a lot of people talk about and is kind of the first advice you run into when you get started online. That advice is to go and do surveys and use other similar sites. While these all have their place, when you really look at how much time it takes, and how little you get, it is really not a viable way to "make money". You would be much better off just getting a second job that you only worked 1 hour a week. I am pretty sure you would probably...
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Re: What is the worst financial advice you've ever received?

Briana ·
Ooooh! Love this question. Mine would probably have to be -- "It doesn't matter what you do with your money right now, as long as you save for retirement, you'll be fine." I think it's so easy to think what you do now won't impact your future, or that you can always make more money -- but I'm glad I learned the value of creating healthy financial habits now so I don't have to worry (as much, hopefully) later!
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Re: What is the worst financial advice you've ever received?

Former Member ·
When I was a broke newly married college student I spent a lot of time reading up on how you could make money by getting your car wrapped in advertisements. I could get paid to drive around! Sadly most of the programs that were hyped up online required you to pay to get more info. I never fell for that scammy part but man, I wasted a lot of time on that research!
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Re: What is the worst financial advice you've ever received?

Duane ·
The worst advice I ever got was to go with a debt settlement company! My experience with what I thought was going to be a help, ended up being a nightmare. My credit was ruined, and my creditors had no patience with me, when they found out, I had chosen a debt settlement company. It was one of the worst experiences of my life, and caused me extreme stress and discomfort!! The lesson I learned was that there is no short cut to paying one’s bills, and that if a medical emergency comes up, and...
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What is the worst financial advice you've ever received?

BeckAtsila ·
I'm feeling playful today--what is the worst financial advice you've ever received? Mine was so bad it was epic and funny, at least to me. I am a professional author of a trade paperback and two e-books, one of which is self-published. This "make a six figure income and travel the world" guru wrote that you could get a six figure income by hiring a ghostwriter (I've done that, too) to write 100 books and sell them on Kindle. This is funny to me because of what all goes in to writing a book.
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Who taught you your most important money lesson and what was it?

Briana ·
Growing up, I didn't necessarily have one specific person I leaned on for financial advice. But I spent a lot of time watching how my own parents struggled, which taught me that I didn't want to do the same. Now, I actively pay attention to what I can and can't afford and how to set myself (and my future family) up for more financial success. What's one money lesson you've taken with you?
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