Tagged With "financial"

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Re: Life Insurance, Disability Insurance, Wills, etc

Moore Income ·
I personally came really close to getting life insurance from the company I have car insurance with. But at the last minute they changed my insurance representative and I just never followed through with it because we had a good relationship with our previous representative and didn't know the new guy. One of the main reasons I didn't follow through was because I felt I was getting pressured but still don't have a good understanding of what to look for when it comes to life insurance. I...
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Re: Life Insurance, Disability Insurance, Wills, etc

Gee ·
Being 63 in a couple of days and in good health, I recently passed all the requirements for a universal life policy with a long term care rider. My spouse will have the proceeds if I die before her even if I’m retired and no longer have the term life policy that my job made available. And the added benefit is that I can draw $10,000 a month after 100 days of an incapacitating illness myself. It reduces the amount payable upon my death but I don’t have to die to benefit from it myself. Win-win!
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Re: A beginner's guide to investing

BeckAtsila ·
I learned everything I know about investing from the Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library. Check your library for books on investing, especially "A Random Walk Down Wall Street" by Burton Malkiel and "Millionaire Teacher" by Andrew Hallam. If you're not a reader, both basically say it's almost impossible to beat the market and you should aim to match the market by buying a diverse index fund. I've managed to invest on $8.50 an hour through Stash, and I keep an emergency fund tied up in...
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Re: Life Insurance, Disability Insurance, Wills, etc

AverageJoe ·
We need to update our wills. We used to get it updated every year when we were with a company that sold legal insurance as sales associates. Now we no longer are with that company, and haven't kept it updated. We are in the process of writing our new wills, and will file them and leave them in appropriate hands. We do realize that it's important to keep things like this updated, though, as well as having a living will and all the correct directives. I don't preach on it, but my sister asked...
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Re: How did you get started working towards your financial goals?

Moore Income ·
"Pay Yourself First" was definitely a big one for me. Although it took me a while to fully grasp the concept. I started learning about it but was hesitant to apply it to my life. I got married last year which was a huge change for me but it also opened my eyes to my lack of financial knowledge and the need to get things under control. Fear was partially a motivator. The fear of getting further in debt and becoming another statistic. Fear of not being able to live a fulfilling life because of...
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Re: How did you get started working towards your financial goals?

BeckAtsila ·
I second "The Richest Man in Babylon". I do something similar to what you do--I get paid on Fridays and each Friday put aside a small amount of money into the Stash app--I'm saving up for a trip to Iceland. I work in the restaurant business and get free food and free coffee, which helps out with my grocery bill. Right now I'm concentrating on paying debt, but had to raid my emergency fund for this month's payment because my hours at work got cut due to road construction. I have several side...
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Re: How did you get started working towards your financial goals?

Briana ·
I love Stash! It's helping me save for my Greece trip right now too. I want to check out this "More for Less" cookbook -- I've been searching for something exactly like this so thank you for the recommendation! If you have any money-saving travel tips, feel free to share! I'd love to hear them =)
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Re: How did you get started working towards your financial goals?

KellyFromKeene ·
I went through a time where life just turned upside down, and I realized that I needed to make some significant financial changes. Its amazing how I was 'struggling' when there was 3 times the money I make now, coming into the house. I did a complete overhaul of my expenses and cut out what was not necessary. It was brutal, but good! I did 'no spend' months, set up several different accounts for savings, and budgeted. I got rid of all credit cards for 5 years and lived only on what I made. I...
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Re: Financial Accomplishments (SHARE YOURS)

Former Member ·
A recent win for me was that I figured out how to put an extra $230 payment on my car each month. I had been making good progress to pay my loan about 2 years early, and now I'm even closer - she should be paid off by July! (Yes, my car is a she. Her name is Birdie, short for Snowbird, because she's white and I bought her right after I moved to Florida.) Once that's done and I allocate those funds toward other debts (I hate my student loans so much), I also want to put aside money for...
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Re: Financial Accomplishments (SHARE YOURS)

KhiemKhiemosabiNguyen ·
I finally automated my distributions out of my paycheck into my savings and Roth IRA! And for the first time, I increased those distributions by 1% each, totally 22% of my paycheck paying myself first! Even though my paycheck looks smaller, it prevents me from spending more because I already took it off the top!
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Re: How did you get started working towards your financial goals?

Bonnie Squires ·
I've $1,000 in the bank and each friday will add $10 to this. I've paid 2 credit cards off with my tax returns and I'm using the money from those monthly payments to pay off other credit cards I'm all so working on my website and selling flash cards,puzzles and other things like that to home school teachers. All so I'll be making candy wrappers. I'm all so looking into selling mugs my be other things. Most will be down loads so no going to the post office. This money will be used to pay off...
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Re: Financial Accomplishments (SHARE YOURS)

Bonnie Squires ·
I've put $1,000 in the bank. Paid $500 and $750 on 2 credit cards off. Paid a bill of a $118 off which the $10 will go in my saving each month. The 2 credit cards I paid off that money will go to paying other credit cards off. I paid for my domain name for a year and hosting for 3 months. Instead of swapping my bank card i've been pulling a certain amount off my card and what ever change i get back i put that up and once the money gone i don't spend any more unless we need some thing food...
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Re: Financial Accomplishments (SHARE YOURS)

Anna Matetic ·
We have taken better control of our budget. I think I got the idea of "sinking funds" from a Penny Hoarder post. We figured out all our bills that are not monthly (car insurance, garbage bill, etc) and figured out a monthly payment for them. We have a separate account for that money. It broke us of the habit of raiding the savings account when we had a bill like that. So now savings grows without interference and we have money set aside when these bills come up!
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Re: How did you get started working towards your financial goals?

Deon Christie ·
And a very effective way of saving @Briana . I do the same with regards to savings and emergency funds. But that is placed aside and cannot be accessed easily. I have saved up for many things this way, because I don't like accounts. Apart from mortgage, insurances and the really necessary stuff. But I never buy appliances, linen, clothes etc through accounts. You save quite a bit on interest costs this way.
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Re: Financial Accomplishments (SHARE YOURS)

Mary G ·
My life mantra:a drop turns into a puddle, a puddle to a pond, a pond to a lake and a lake to an ocean! Make every dollar work for you...Citibank 2% cash back cc. Charge everything and pay bill in full every month. Over 6 yrs we have earned over $7000 in cash back points. Pay as many bills as possible with the cc. We’re very frugal...shop at 2nd hand stores, order ice water when we eat out, etc...it’s the little things that add up. We’re super savers putting away over 30% of our earned...
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Re: Financial Accomplishments (SHARE YOURS)

Bonnie Squires ·
MARY G sounds like you have a really good plan there.
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Re: Financial Accomplishments (SHARE YOURS)

Moore Income ·
@Mary G Sounds like you are putting to practice some great financial principles. I am still learning and just starting to put into practice good financial principles for a better financial future.
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Re: How I Live On 50% Of My Net Income

Men On A Budget ·
Awesome journey! Thanks so much for sharing it with us.
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Re: Who taught you your most important money lesson and what was it?

Moore Income ·
Pay yourself first. This I learned from many books and successful people. It is a principal that truly works when you start applying it. There is a lot that could be said about it but the best book I have read on the subject would have to be The Richest Man in Babylon. You can find it on Amazon but if you want to save some money and get more books for less, I recommended Thrift Books.
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Re: Who taught you your most important money lesson and what was it?

AverageJoe ·
If we tithe to a local church, how do we pay ourselves first? Should we come directly AFTER the church, and then bills, food etc? Just curious on your take on it.
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Re: Who taught you your most important money lesson and what was it?

Moore Income ·
Good question. I personally view tithing as giving back a portion to God in thankfulness for what He has given me. Therefore I would apply the principle of paying myself first after tithe. For those of us who do this, it means we have to learn to live off of only 80% of what we earn instead of 90% but I think it is a good way to learn to live below our means. And if you practice the principle of tithing first, you can trust God's promises in His Word to take care of those who holds Him in ...
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Re: Who taught you your most important money lesson and what was it?

Sewspcl ·
My mother. She always said make a trash small. Save your pennies, pick up a penny. Water down everything to make more including soup, spaghetti sauces, gravies. We made and popcorn and VHS tapes to entertain ourselves. Always pay yourself 1st period try saving $50 a week by the end of the month you've got $200. If not weekly try bi-weekly. Don't throw out old clothes just cut them up and make a blanket or throw. Being thrifty doesn't mean being cheap. Because you always end up with more...
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Re: Who taught you your most important money lesson and what was it?

Sewspcl ·
Pay yourself 1st then pay your bills and tithing. Is not ego it's economics. If you get sick because you're not eating could you can afford food but you going to church every week who are you helping? Let go of ego and pay yourself 1st. Then get back to others. Make sure the church that you are giving to does not squander your money on wines and fine china like my church did.
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Re: Who taught you your most important money lesson and what was it?

Moore Income ·
@SEWSPCL Interested in understanding why you consider it "ego"?
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Re: Stop the Paycheck to Paycheck Cycle by Being Mindful of Your Financial Habits

Moore Income ·
You can say that again! We tend to develop bad financial habits from an early age and they become hard to break and leave us wondering where we went wrong. I would have to say that a lot of times, life gets in the way when you are trying to stop the living paycheck to paycheck cycle. Just when you think you are getting some traction, life hits you with another surprise. I find often that bad habits such as a lack of budgeting and keeping track of finances and living above your means are...
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Re: Can Budgeting Come with Baggage?

Moore Income ·
You hit the nail on the coffin here when it comes to budgeting. All of those have been things that have held me back from really creating and sticking to a budget. I am still working on it actually, but at the beginning of this year I made it a point that I would do what it takes to get my finances in order and that includes budgeting. On the topic of fear, I just read the book Who Moved My Cheese? and it talks about the fact that a lot of times what we fear and image the outcome of...
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Re: Can Budgeting Come with Baggage?

The Saving Scientist ·
Exactly, Ron! I'm really glad to hear that you're taking steps in the right direction. I look forward to reading more of your posts and seeing how your financial journey goes. We can all learn something from each other! Feel free to reach out at any time if you need any advice
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Re: Who taught you your most important money lesson and what was it?

BeckAtsila ·
"Pennies add up to dimes, and dimes add up to dollars." My across-the-street neighbor when I was 4.
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Re: Who taught you your most important money lesson and what was it?

KellyFromKeene ·
I cant think of a particular person- but I can think of things I learned from several people. My parents taught me that tithing is important, although I have not always done that. My ex taught me that I don't need a lot of things to be happy- after I lost it all in a divorce. My boyfriend taught me how important it is to save and plan for the future. My kids taught me that people are the most important thing and that everything else is a distant second.
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Re: Reading Goals

Qsusan ·
My goal is to read one book a month. Sometimes I do 3 in 2 months. I also read financial blogs and Kiplinger magazine. Education is a life-long endeavor! My favorite financial book so far is by Elizabeth Warren, "This Fight is Our Fight." It really summarizes how people live, how we got here, and what we need next. Her other book, "The Two-Income Trap," is also excellent. I actually own both. I check out books from the public library and I purchase my own copy when I find I LOVE them...
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Re: Reading Goals

Moore Income ·
@Qsusan thanks for the recommendations, I will check them out. I like buying my used books from ThriftBooks.com . They have lots of titles at great prices that vary based on the condition. Also, if you buy $10 or more in books you get FREE SHIPPING. I have saved a ton of money buying books from here. You can generally get 3 or 4 books for around $10 with free shipping.
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Re: Reading Goals

FreebiePharm ·
If anyone has some good FREE reading resources let me know. The local library is slim pickings...
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Re: Can Budgeting Come with Baggage?

FreebiePharm ·
My biggest setback with budgeting is consistency. I feel I would start it but not continue. I am halfway there on budgeting. I write down my expenses bi-weekly but do not account for "small" purchases. This would be my goal as well as an envelope system.
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Re: Who taught you your most important money lesson and what was it?

FreebiePharm ·
I would say my parents but by doing what they didn't do. I prefer not to spend my money, I am always looking for ways I can obtain things I need for free. The only financial footstep I followed was buying a new car and having that debt, which I wish I had never done. I should have bought a used car and had it paid off.
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Re: Reading Goals

Qsusan ·
@MOORE INCOME thank YOU for the recommendation of ThriftBooks.com. I will DEFinitely check that one out. I have a wish list. lol
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Re: Reading Goals

Jules ·
I've always been a super avid reader since childhood, and my goal this year is to finish 64 books. With that being said, 4/5 books are audiobooks. I've been using Audible the last two years and amassed quite an (expensive) selection. Recently I found Scribd, which is unlimited Audiobooks for $8.99. The difference is with Audible you buy the book and keep it forever but Scribd is more like Netflix for audiobooks - you don't get to keep it, but you can listen to as much as you want so long as...
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Re: Reading Goals

Moore Income ·
@Jules that's good to know about the audiobooks. I personally prefer to read physical copies of books (not really a fan of eBooks either) but I know many people who prefer to listen. The important thing is to get and understand the knowledge being shared. I like the idea of Scribd but I think I would prefer to own the book if I was going to do audio.
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Re: Reading Goals

Former Member ·
I recently read Oxen, by Joseph Sangl. It is a really short, easy read with a biblical perspective. I have not yet read but it is on my to do list “Street Smarts” by Jim Rogers.
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Re: Who taught you your most important money lesson and what was it?

Kenny Mathe ·
To pay myself first is the good idea for example if may salary is less do I have to pay half of my salary to make my tithe and I would be left with nothing to pay my bills and my children remain without food in the house.If I pay what I can afford is it a problem
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Re: Who taught you your most important money lesson and what was it?

Bonnie Squires ·
Once I get my tax return I putting a good amount of money in the bank. Once I get a bill from my old place paid off than that will go into the bank account it wont be much only $10 a week but that an extra $40 a month in the bank.
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Re: Reading Goals

Kassidy King ·
@FreebiePharm I came across this app Libby, by OverDrive by OverDrive, Inc It’s basically access to all the audiobooks available from your current library.
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Re: Reading Goals

sphgrl35 ·
scribd.com is great. You can sign up and get 30 days free-if you start the sign up process, but don't add you cc info the next day you'll get an email offering you 60 days free -after the free trial either cancel or pay $7.99 a month. They have a great selection of books, audiobooks, magazines and docs; you can also self-publish if you're looking for a little creative feedback I have also used Kobo before too, but that's mostly for audiobooks.
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Re: Reading Goals

Moore Income ·
@sphgrl35 That's a nice little money saving hack! Thanks for sharing!
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Re: Reading Goals

FreebiePharm ·
Thanks for the reminder on audiobooks! Sometimes that selection is better at the library and I have a 3 hr drive Friday; perhaps I can find something on finances!
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Re: How I Live On 50% Of My Net Income

FreebiePharm ·
What an interesting read. Thanks for sharing your journey!
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Re: Reading Goals

Moore Income ·
Just finished reading the book " Opportunity " by Eban Pagan. It was a pretty intense read with a lot of deep topics but it helped me in recognizing opportunity and learning how to choose the right opportunities in my life. I lent the book " Who Moved My Cheese? " to a coworker who saw me reading it, she is almost finished and another coworker is already asking to read it next. I definitely recommend it for people who are struggling with change at their job.
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Re: How I Live On 50% Of My Net Income

Moore Income ·
Great to see people like yourself who are taking control of finances! March is right around the corner. I look forward to hearing more of your journey!
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Re: How I Live On 50% Of My Net Income

DottieRose ·
I have been trying to research ways to better my financial future on my own for a few years now. I'm not stupid but there is so much information out there that I'm overwhelmed. I was giving up hope and then by accident, I found PennyHoarder and your article. Your journey gives me hope that I can do this! Thank you for sharing.
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Re: What is the worst financial advice you've ever received?

Moore Income ·
I think some of the worst advice for making money a lot of people talk about and is kind of the first advice you run into when you get started online. That advice is to go and do surveys and use other similar sites. While these all have their place, when you really look at how much time it takes, and how little you get, it is really not a viable way to "make money". You would be much better off just getting a second job that you only worked 1 hour a week. I am pretty sure you would probably...
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Re: What is the worst financial advice you've ever received?

Briana ·
Ooooh! Love this question. Mine would probably have to be -- "It doesn't matter what you do with your money right now, as long as you save for retirement, you'll be fine." I think it's so easy to think what you do now won't impact your future, or that you can always make more money -- but I'm glad I learned the value of creating healthy financial habits now so I don't have to worry (as much, hopefully) later!
 
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