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Hey @Leon! If you can afford to pay at least the minimum for your bills, try to do that, even if the lender or service provider is being lenient. Even if they're being lenient about late payments and reporting to the credit bureaus, that's money that you'll still be paying back at some point.

If you can't afford the minimums, focus on staying healthy and housed. That means groceries and prescriptions get top priority.

Staying on top of your housing payments should also take priority, even though a lot of foreclosures and evictions have been paused both by federal government agencies and state/local governments in the short term, because the stakes of becoming seriously delinquent on your housing payment are a lot higher than what's at stake, if say, you default on credit card payments. This is especially true if you rent, as it's a lot easier to evict someone than it is to foreclose upon someone.

From there, your best bet is to talk to your bank and service providers about its policies for people who miss payments because of COVID-19-related hardship. Some utility providers are holding off on service disconnections and waiving late fees, while credit card companies may waive late fees or let you miss your payment for a month or two. Again, talk to your providers so that you can determine what bills will hurt you least if you skip them. Prioritize from there — and be prepared for long wait times when you make these calls, because a lot of people are calling to figure out the exact same thing.

As for extra streams of income, here are some suggestions from my colleague @Adam Hardy, who writes about side gigs and careers:

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