Learning about how to manage your finances is hard! Today, we are inundated with tons of personal finance content - do this, don't spend that - but what's the right advice? Where do we start? 

For me -- it's the whole "pay yourself first method," which is exactly what I've started doing to start building a savings (and travel fund!) Each paycheck, I'm intentionally depositing a portion of each check into my savings account - that I'm not allowed to touch. Instead of going out to eat numerous times a week, that money is now being saved for something that I can get much more use out of. 

I'm curious how some of you have started working towards your personal finance goals. What has worked for you? What hasn't? I'm ready to be inspired! =) 

I enjoy reading up on building communities, LOTR marathons, ocean conservation efforts (such as volunteering), and playing with my puppy Thor. 

Original Post

"Pay Yourself First" was definitely a big one for me. Although it took me a while to fully grasp the concept. I started learning about it but was hesitant to apply it to my life.

I got married last year which was a huge change for me but it also opened my eyes to my lack of financial knowledge and the need to get things under control.

Fear was partially a motivator. The fear of getting further in debt and becoming another statistic. Fear of not being able to live a fulfilling life because of financial burdens.

It took a while for me and it wasn't until I really started acknowledging my weaknesses that I was really able to make a change.

Once I started doing this, I started reading lot's of financial literature and seeking out a mentor all who have helped me begin the journey to a better financial future.

A book that is among my list of favorites is "The Richest Man In Babylon" which goes in depth on the topic of paying yourself first.

I second "The Richest Man in Babylon".  I do something similar to what you do--I get paid on Fridays and each Friday put aside a small amount of money into the Stash app--I'm saving up for a trip to Iceland.  I work in the restaurant business and get free food and free coffee, which helps out with my grocery bill.  Right now I'm concentrating on paying debt, but had to raid my emergency fund for this month's payment because my hours at work got cut due to road construction.  I have several side hustles and am always researching ways to make money or save money--I"m a huge fan of the Field Agent app!  I'm also a big fan of the local public library, which has several books on finances, and also allows you to check out e-books.

One trick I learned is how to cook Asian food.  It's extremely budget-friendly, fast, and tasty.  I live in Indianapolis, which has a huge ethnic grocery store called Saraga that sells just about everything you could need.  I recommend the cookbook "More with Less"--it's got some great cheap recipes and the title sums up its philosophy.  "Extending the Table", its companion cookbook, is also excellent and has my go-to fried rice recipe.

BeckAtsila posted:

I second "The Richest Man in Babylon".  I do something similar to what you do--I get paid on Fridays and each Friday put aside a small amount of money into the Stash app--I'm saving up for a trip to Iceland.  I work in the restaurant business and get free food and free coffee, which helps out with my grocery bill.  Right now I'm concentrating on paying debt, but had to raid my emergency fund for this month's payment because my hours at work got cut due to road construction.  I have several side hustles and am always researching ways to make money or save money--I"m a huge fan of the Field Agent app!  I'm also a big fan of the local public library, which has several books on finances, and also allows you to check out e-books.

One trick I learned is how to cook Asian food.  It's extremely budget-friendly, fast, and tasty.  I live in Indianapolis, which has a huge ethnic grocery store called Saraga that sells just about everything you could need.  I recommend the cookbook "More with Less"--it's got some great cheap recipes and the title sums up its philosophy.  "Extending the Table", its companion cookbook, is also excellent and has my go-to fried rice recipe.

I love Stash! It's helping me save for my Greece trip right now too. I want to check out this "More for Less" cookbook -- I've been searching for something exactly like this so thank you for the recommendation! If you have any money-saving travel tips, feel free to share! I'd love to hear them =) 

I went through a time where life just turned upside down, and I realized that I needed to make some significant financial changes. Its amazing how I was 'struggling' when there was 3 times the money I make now, coming into the house. I did a complete overhaul of my expenses and cut out what was not necessary. It was brutal, but good! I did 'no spend' months, set up several different accounts for savings, and budgeted. I got rid of all credit cards for 5 years and lived only on what I made. I saved any 'extra' money, like tax returns, or I used them for something I needed, but had to wait for. I'm by no means where I want to be financially (I want this student debt GONE!) but I'm in a much better and more secure place. 

I've $1,000 in the bank and each friday will add $10 to this.
I've paid 2 credit cards off with my tax returns and I'm using the
money from those monthly payments to pay off other credit cards
I'm all so working on my website and selling flash cards,puzzles
and other things like that to home school teachers. All so I'll be making
candy wrappers. I'm all so looking into selling mugs my be other things.
Most will be down loads so no going to the post office. This money will
be used to pay off my credit cards and put more into savings. 

I all so save change to.

Briana posted:

Learning about how to manage your finances is hard! Today, we are inundated with tons of personal finance content - do this, don't spend that - but what's the right advice? Where do we start? 

For me -- it's the whole "pay yourself first method," which is exactly what I've started doing to start building a savings (and travel fund!) Each paycheck, I'm intentionally depositing a portion of each check into my savings account - that I'm not allowed to touch. Instead of going out to eat numerous times a week, that money is now being saved for something that I can get much more use out of. 

I'm curious how some of you have started working towards your personal finance goals. What has worked for you? What hasn't? I'm ready to be inspired! =) 

And a very effective way of saving @Briana. I do the same with regards to savings and emergency funds. But that is placed aside and cannot be accessed easily. I have saved up for many things this way, because I don't like accounts. 

Apart from mortgage, insurances and the really necessary stuff. But I never buy appliances, linen, clothes etc through accounts. You save quite a bit on interest costs this way. 

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