Skip to main content

Hi! I just watched the Marie Kondo series on Netflix (like apparently half the world did) and it got me started on my second round of KonMari-ing my house. A lot of people have talked about how clearing out the clutter in their houses has helped them feel better emotionally, but one of the things I was surprised to discover was that it actually helped my financial situation too.  It really made me become intentional about the things I bought, especially when it came to clothes.  Like, if I was looking at an item of clothing and I was on the fence about it, I would usually end up not buying it.

I've heard some people talk about how they sold their stuff on Poshmark, Mercari, etc., and I've done that too, but probably the most profound effect it's had on me is inspiring me to spend way less money, which has meant more money for my savings and less debt. 

Has anyone else tried out the KonMari method and found it helped their finances in some way? If so I'd be curious to hear what your experiences have been with this!

I work with The Penny Hoarder's editorial team. I'm a mom to two cats and a greyhound, and I'm a runner and triathlete who is also trying to be the best at exercising.

Original Post

Replies sorted oldest to newest

I must be behind a bit because this is the first I have heard of the KonMari method. I will be doing a little research on it.

I have recently been doing a bit of research into minimalism and living with less. I personally grew up not having much as my parents were constantly traveling so we didn't collect too many possessions.

I prefer to have less stuff but have found that when you settle down for any period of time, you tend to collect more than you need.

The more I do realize how little stuff actually means to me, the less likely I am to want to purchase more so I can see how developing any kind of mindset about having less stuff could be beneficial to ones finances.

If the KonMari method has something to do with helping people do that, then you can bet I want in on it! 

I'm impressed that you've managed to miss the onslaught of writing about this! You must teach us your ways.

The thing I found interesting about Marie Kondo's approach which is that it's about respecting and honoring the things you have in your life, whether it's because it served a role or because someone gave it to you with love or you learned that you *don't* need items like that in your life.  It's a nice counterbalance to the way a lot of people approach buying and accumulating things by encouraging gratitude, thoughtfulness and respect for your belongings, as opposed to just accumulation for the sake of accumulation.  I suspect you'll find it interesting!  

First I have heard of this method, but have focused on reducing clutter in the house in an effort to clear my mind and reduce expenses. It has helped reduced expenses because by reducing the amount of stuff in our home, the focus becomes on using what we already have. It is amazing to find all the things that sit around your home never used. And when you're focused on having less, you are less motivated to buy stuff and bring more back in your home.

FreebiePharm posted:

First I have heard of this method, but have focused on reducing clutter in the house in an effort to clear my mind and reduce expenses. It has helped reduced expenses because by reducing the amount of stuff in our home, the focus becomes on using what we already have. It is amazing to find all the things that sit around your home never used. And when you're focused on having less, you are less motivated to buy stuff and bring more back in your home.

FreebiePharm, I had to laugh when I read your sentence about finding all the things sitting around your home that are never used.  I have found *four* tape measures. Four! That would be a lot even if I were super into carpentry, but the most I've ever done with those tape measures is hang art on my walls. Yeah, probably not going to buy one of those again!

Caitlin Constantine posted:
FreebiePharm posted:

First I have heard of this method, but have focused on reducing clutter in the house in an effort to clear my mind and reduce expenses. It has helped reduced expenses because by reducing the amount of stuff in our home, the focus becomes on using what we already have. It is amazing to find all the things that sit around your home never used. And when you're focused on having less, you are less motivated to buy stuff and bring more back in your home.

FreebiePharm, I had to laugh when I read your sentence about finding all the things sitting around your home that are never used.  I have found *four* tape measures. Four! That would be a lot even if I were super into carpentry, but the most I've ever done with tape measures is hang art on my walls. Yeah, probably not going to buy one of those again!

At least it's stuff that's inexpensive, right? My father used to buy doubles of everything, including kitchen appliances. We were always like, why do you need two of those? Watching him be so wasteful has probably motivated my quest to reduce!

FreebiePharm posted:
Caitlin Constantine posted:
FreebiePharm posted:

First I have heard of this method, but have focused on reducing clutter in the house in an effort to clear my mind and reduce expenses. It has helped reduced expenses because by reducing the amount of stuff in our home, the focus becomes on using what we already have. It is amazing to find all the things that sit around your home never used. And when you're focused on having less, you are less motivated to buy stuff and bring more back in your home.

FreebiePharm, I had to laugh when I read your sentence about finding all the things sitting around your home that are never used.  I have found *four* tape measures. Four! That would be a lot even if I were super into carpentry, but the most I've ever done with tape measures is hang art on my walls. Yeah, probably not going to buy one of those again!

At least it's stuff that's inexpensive, right? My father used to buy doubles of everything, including kitchen appliances. We were always like, why do you need two of those? Watching him be so wasteful has probably motivated my quest to reduce!

Oh wow, I feel like I would run out of room in my house pretty dang quickly if I had that approach to buying things!

I had to chuckle. Before I read this post a couple days ago, I knew nothing of the subject.

Just now I was reading the book "Opportunity" (which I purchased about a year ago). On page 186 he mentions Marie Kondo and her recommendation to ask if your stuff brings you Joy.

I find it funny because now that I know about this, it keeps popping up everywhere LOL

Add Reply

Post

Related Content

Loading...
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×