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Although you can place your geyser circuit on a timer to only switch on at a certain time. It doesn't make electrically any sense to me. Because to warm up 150 Liters of water couldn't use much less electricity than just to keep the same water at a constant temperature. 

Therefore I just wrapped my geyser in a thermal blanket to keep the heat in and not having to warm the water that often. I have also replaced all light bulbs with energy saving light bulbs or LED lamps. LED lamps use very low voltage and hardly any amps. Amp usage or KWh (Kilowatt Hour) is what determines your electricity bill. 

And the less load you put on your electricity supply, the less you will pay. It's all about lessening the Amperage use. Which is also why I switched to gas with regard to stove and kettle. Any element will skyrocket your electricity usage. Because it uses a lot more Amperage. 

All these applications saved me almost 50% on my electricity bill. But it is rather costly to implement all the shortcuts. It is still a saving no matter which way you look at it. 

 

Deon Christie

Aspiring writer and enthusiastic blogger with extensive SEO knowledge.

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I am renting a pretty efficient house, especially for New England. I have only used about $500 worth of heat this winter, and that is down from the $1500 that I may usually use living in another house. But that is propane. The place was set up with new efficient appliances when I moved in.To save on electricity, I have lights on a timer, replace all bulbs with LED as they need replacing, and just make sure switches are OFF when I leave.  This is challenging with a few kids, but really, we don't use much. I pay less here in a 3 bedroom house, then I did in a apartment half this size.  

KellyFromKeene posted:

I am renting a pretty efficient house, especially for New England. I have only used about $500 worth of heat this winter, and that is down from the $1500 that I may usually use living in another house. But that is propane. The place was set up with new efficient appliances when I moved in.To save on electricity, I have lights on a timer, replace all bulbs with LED as they need replacing, and just make sure switches are OFF when I leave.  This is challenging with a few kids, but really, we don't use much. I pay less here in a 3 bedroom house, then I did in a apartment half this size.  

That's a massive saving indeed @KellyFromKeene. I also experienced the massive drop in cost when moving from an apartment to a house. I think the apartment buildings are being ripped off, but that's just my opinion. 

Great move with the LED lights. It's a major energy saving factor. 

KellyFromKeene posted:

And I like the illumination from the LED lights better. It's brighter, with fewer bulbs. I'm a big fan. They are worth the extra cost. 

Indeed they are @KellyFromKeene. Brightness of globes is often also categorized into two choices. Warm white (the yellowish light) and Cool White. Which is the brighter light you currently have. Not sure how it works in your area. But it's something I always check in South Africa. 

We live in an apartment where heat is paid (which was a blessing this winter!) so our electricity bill comes out to around $30 a month which isn't that bad.

I am not extremely conservative but I did learn the habit of always turning off the light when I leave the room and only keeping it on in areas you are using.

While this is a good habit, it has also gotten me into a couple funny situations in the past couple weeks.

One, I accidentally turned off the light in a public restroom when there was someone using the stall...

And then, I was walking out of a common area where two guys were playing chess, without thinking I flipped the light switch off and they both just stared at me with a look of surprise 

Moore Income posted:

We live in an apartment where heat is paid (which was a blessing this winter!) so our electricity bill comes out to around $30 a month which isn't that bad.

I am not extremely conservative but I did learn the habit of always turning off the light when I leave the room and only keeping it on in areas you are using.

While this is a good habit, it has also gotten me into a couple funny situations in the past couple weeks.

One, I accidentally turned off the light in a public restroom when there was someone using the stall...

And then, I was walking out of a common area where two guys were playing chess, without thinking I flipped the light switch off and they both just stared at me with a look of surprise 

In South Africa we're lucky enough to not have the "heating" bill @Moore Income. In dollar (ZAR/USD) my electricity bill is around $20 - $30 (300 - 400 ZAR) too. 

Turning off the light...lol!?  I hope the occupant cleaned the mess...lol!

DEON CHRISTIE we live in a small place so outside
lights we don't need allot of. We don't have a TV. 
We set an alarm on the computer to get the kids up
for school and work. So there only a need for 1 light 
to be on. I'm thinking about getting one of those battery
lights for the stairway because the boys come plain about
going down the stairs at night. We had a light up there but
it kept 1 of our son awake at night and our other son would
leave it on all the time.

Our light bill run about $200 a month but that has our trash
sewer and water not sure what else is on the bill. Than our
lights runs about $150. This is give or take a little bit. 

Bonnie Squires posted:

DEON CHRISTIE we live in a small place so outside
lights we don't need allot of. We don't have a TV. 
We set an alarm on the computer to get the kids up
for school and work. So there only a need for 1 light 
to be on. I'm thinking about getting one of those battery
lights for the stairway because the boys come plain about
going down the stairs at night. We had a light up there but
it kept 1 of our son awake at night and our other son would
leave it on all the time.

Our light bill run about $200 a month but that has our trash
sewer and water not sure what else is on the bill. Than our
lights runs about $150. This is give or take a little bit. 

That's quite an electricity bill @Bonnie Squires. Do you perhaps have a swimming pool pump or perhaps more than one fridge and/or freezer?

Bonnie Squires posted:

DEON CHRISTIE so  do i. I wish they had left the fire place in.
I know there was 1 upstairs. I love sitting in front of one during
the winter with hot chocolate or a cup of tea.

Sounds cozy @Bonnie Squires. We usually do that on hunting trips in the African Bush-veld. Sit around a bonfire and just enjoy odd moments of silence in all the chatter and laughter. But I would also love a fireplace in my house, although it doesn't really get extremely cold.

DEON CHRISTIE I understand that. I still tell every
my home is New York. I lived there most of my life.
The Hampton's is where the ocean are and it is so
pretty. Upstate New York nothing like walking outside
and seeing deer and other wild animals on your lawn. 

Here in KS you have farms but its cows and some places
have horses. Than there other parts that are nothing but
different grains. But KS isn't to bad. You go to the bigger
city's and they have more things there to do. But I like a
simple life.

Bonnie Squires posted:

DEON CHRISTIE I understand that. I still tell every
my home is New York. I lived there most of my life.
The Hampton's is where the ocean are and it is so
pretty. Upstate New York nothing like walking outside
and seeing deer and other wild animals on your lawn. 

Here in KS you have farms but its cows and some places
have horses. Than there other parts that are nothing but
different grains. But KS isn't to bad. You go to the bigger
city's and they have more things there to do. But I like a
simple life.

I prefer a simple life @Bonnie Squires. Makes life a lot less complicated.

Deon Christie posted:

Although you can place your geyser circuit on a timer to only switch on at a certain time. It doesn't make electrically any sense to me. Because to warm up 150 Liters of water couldn't use much less electricity than just to keep the same water at a constant temperature. 

Therefore I just wrapped my geyser in a thermal blanket to keep the heat in and not having to warm the water that often. I have also replaced all light bulbs with energy saving light bulbs or LED lamps. LED lamps use very low voltage and hardly any amps. Amp usage or KWh (Kilowatt Hour) is what determines your electricity bill. 

And the less load you put on your electricity supply, the less you will pay. It's all about lessening the Amperage use. Which is also why I switched to gas with regard to stove and kettle. Any element will skyrocket your electricity usage. Because it uses a lot more Amperage. 

All these applications saved me almost 50% on my electricity bill. But it is rather costly to implement all the shortcuts. It is still a saving no matter which way you look at it. 

 

I installed solar panels to power the 120v needs of out buildings and the shop

 

J Glenn Bryant posted:
Deon Christie posted:

Although you can place your geyser circuit on a timer to only switch on at a certain time. It doesn't make electrically any sense to me. Because to warm up 150 Liters of water couldn't use much less electricity than just to keep the same water at a constant temperature. 

Therefore I just wrapped my geyser in a thermal blanket to keep the heat in and not having to warm the water that often. I have also replaced all light bulbs with energy saving light bulbs or LED lamps. LED lamps use very low voltage and hardly any amps. Amp usage or KWh (Kilowatt Hour) is what determines your electricity bill. 

And the less load you put on your electricity supply, the less you will pay. It's all about lessening the Amperage use. Which is also why I switched to gas with regard to stove and kettle. Any element will skyrocket your electricity usage. Because it uses a lot more Amperage. 

All these applications saved me almost 50% on my electricity bill. But it is rather costly to implement all the shortcuts. It is still a saving no matter which way you look at it. 

 

I installed solar panels to power the 120v needs of out buildings and the shop

 

Quite a costly exercise @J Glenn Bryant. We however have supply voltages varying from 220V - 380V in South Africa. The reticulation is done with 380V, and houses supplied with 220V.

Solar is rather expensive to install @Moore Income. But the size of your solar system is calculated through kWh (Kilowatt per Hour) demand. Basically how much power you use during your most busiest times at home, when using the most power. 

The batteries on a solar system is most expensive, solar panels not so much. A high quality solar battery (one) can set you back as much as 150,000 ZAR ($10,00 - $15,000). Just as a rough estimation. And normally any decent sized solar system will need more than one battery. 

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